Colin Grant-Adams and Hope Vere Anderson
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Colin
Scotland Tour
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April 25th---May 6th
FEATURING IN SCOTLAND
Leave USA April 25th Arrive in Glasgow April 26th in the morning picked up by Coach and travel to Oban, stay four nights. At The Manor House Hotel, April 26th,27th,28th,29,with daily trips to Iona, The Isle of Seil, Glen Coe, The Crinan Canal, isle of Sky, and many places in between.
Then drive to Glasgow May 5th overnight Premier Inn, Glasgow Airport. May 6th. Depart Glasgow for return flight to the USA. Itinerary subject to change
Seil is one of the Slate Islands, located on the east side of the Firth of Lorn, 7 miles southwest of Oban, in Scotland. Seil has been linked to the mainland by bridge since the late 18th century. Known as the bridge over the Atlantic
Iona is a small island in the Inner Hebrides off the Ross of Mull on the western coast of Scotland. It is mainly known for Iona Abbey, though there are other buildings on the island. Iona Abbey was a centre of Gaelic monasticism for three centuries and is today known for its relative tranquility and natural environment. It is a tourist destination and a place for spiritual retreats. Its modern Gaelic name means "Iona of Columba".
Glencoe is perhaps Scotlandís most famous and most scenic glen. Glencoe is also arguably Scotlandís most historic glen, and it was recently voted as Scotlandís most romantic glen. Glencoe is not only a holiday centre for hillwalking and mountaineering, it is also an ideal base from which to explore the Highlands of Scotland
The Crinan Canal between Crinan and Ardrishaig in Argyll and Bute in the west of Scotland is operated by Scottish Canals. The canal, which opened in 1801, takes its name from the village of Crinan at its western end. Approximately nine miles long, the canal connects the village of Ardrishaig on Loch Gilp with the Sound of Jura, providing a navigable route between the Clyde and the Inner Hebrides, without the need for a long diversion around the Kintyre peninsula, and in particular the exposed Mull of Kintyre.
Skye, or the Isle of Skye, is the largest and northernmost of the major islands in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. The island's peninsulas radiate from a mountainous centre dominated by the Cuillins, the rocky slopes of which provide some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the country. Although it has been suggested that the Gaelic Sgitheanach describes a winged shape there is no definitive agreement as to the name's origins.
Leave Oban April 30th, stay over night Pitlochry, At the Atholl Palace Hotel, May 1st Visit the new Highland Games Museum at Braemar, the Duke of Rothesay Highland Games Pavilion on site, a museum dedicated to the history of the games. and private guided tour of Balmoral Castle. or Scone Palace has an exciting and colourful history as one of Scotland's most important stately homes. Fifteen hundred years ago it was the capital of the Picts. In the intervening centuries, it has been the seat of parliaments and the crowning place of the Kings of Scots, including Macbeth and Robert The Bruce.
Balmoral
Castle
Scone Palace
Then drive down to, Dumfries and Galloway, to stay in border town Moffat, four nights, May 1st, 2nd, 3rd,4th, staying at the Annandale Arms Hotel, with daily visits to The Robert Burns Cottage and Museum, The John Paul Jones Cottage Museum, Caerlaverock Castle, Hadrianís Wall, and many more places in between,
Burns Cottage, the first home of Robert Burns is located in Alloway, South Ayrshire, Scotland. It was built by his father, William Burness in 1757. Burns, Scotland's national poet, was born there on 25 January 1759. It is a simple two-roomed clay and thatch cottage and has been fully restored to become part of Robert Burns Birthplace Museum.
The John Paul Jones Cottage Museum is located on the Arbigland Estate near Kirkbean in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. The cottage is where John Paul Jones, hero of the American Revolutionary War and founder of the United States Navy, was born in 1747. Jones' father was a gardener for the estate.
Caerlaverock Castle is a moated triangular castle first built in the 13th century. It is located on the southern coast of Scotland, 11 kilometres south of Dumfries, on the edge of the Caerlaverock National Nature Reserve. Caerlaverock was a stronghold of the Maxwell family from the 13th century until the 17th century when the castle was abandoned. It was besieged by the English during the Wars of Scottish Independence, and underwent several partial demolitions and reconstructions over the 14th and 15th centuries. In the 17th century, the Maxwells were created Earls of Nithsdale, and built a new lodging within the walls, described as among "the most ambitious early classical domestic architecture in Scotland". In 1640 the castle was besieged for the last time and was subsequently abandoned. Although demolished and rebuilt several times, the castle retains the distinctive triangular plan first laid out in the 13th century. Caerlaverock Castle was built to control trade in early times.
Hadrian's Wall, also called the Roman Wall, Picts' Wall, or Vallum Hadriani in Latin, was a defensive fortification in the Roman province of Britannia, begun in AD 122 in the reign of the emperor Hadrian. It ran from the banks of the River Tyne near the North Sea to the Solway Firth on the Irish Sea, and was the northern limit of the Roman Empire, immediately north of which were the lands of the northern Ancient Britons, including the Picts.
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